Tag Archives: wolverine

Kids on Classics: Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter (Alex vs Lukas)

It took a couple of weeks but I got Alex and Lukas back on the arcade console. I thought we might play something new but all, Alex could think about was Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter and I can’t blame him. It is a great game! So for the first time we get Alex going against Lukas (in video games, they go against each other in real life constantly). At least they do for a few minutes until Lukas gets distracted. Okay so maybe it is a little false advertising but what do you want from me? Enjoy!

 

 

 

Advertisements

The Wolverine The Review

the-wolverine-wallpaperWhen first watching “The Wolverine,” all I could do was compare it to “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.” It just had to be better than that mess. That wasn’t too difficult to do. However, once I started to let the second Wolverine movie stand on its own, I realized it didn’t little more past that initial goal.

The film has Logan going to Japan so that a dying man whom Logan saved in World War II can say a proper good bye before passing. As a thank you for saving him all those year’s ago, the man offers Logan, who does not age thanks to his healing ability, a chance to be mortal. Of course nothing can ever be that simple, and throughout the movie we see everyone’s true intentions and how they all collide with each other.

Here is the main way this movie surpasses Origins. Where Wolverine’s first solo effort was heavily tied to the other X-Men movies, this one essentially stands on its own. Jean Grey does have a significant role, but she mostly acts as a vehicle for Wolvie’s inner thoughts and you are brought up to speed easily enough. Through Jean, we see how Logan has had enough of the life he has led killing and watching his loved ones die while he doesn’t age. It’s the killing part however that is my first gripe with the film, and all the movies Wolverine has been in the more I think about it.

Wolverine is most notable for being a ferocious killing machine who goes into berserker rage. While that behavior is certainly referenced, we never actually see it. At no point does he ever lose control of his actions and really let loose. Instead he just fights everyone in a controlled fashion. He should be acting like an animal on the loose. He doesn’t even really take advantage of the fact that he has razor sharp claws coming out of his hands. Sure there are some stabs, but he fights more like Batman than a wild animal. Overall, the fight scenes are just a bit tame. Yes, the bullet train scene was cool, but there just weren’t many moments that got a big reaction from the audience.

My other gripe is the way they handled Logan losing his healing ability. I had a small issue with how it was taken instead of him choosing to have it removed, but the effects of it are what really bothered me. It could have been played as a big dramatic moment for him. Sustaining real pain that doesn’t go away for the first time. Just popping out his claws the first time without a healing factor could have made him scream. Instead he just gets a little dizzy from wounds and has a limp for a while. Then when he does have his healing factor, it is basically just seen healing cuts that he gets on his face so that enemies can look freaked out when they realize they can’t hurt him. It all just comes off as playing it too safe.

Just once during the movie I would have liked to see Wolverine get his face blown off and see a gruesome shot of his skull or guts exposed, or seeing any other character bleed or lose a limb. It doesn’t have to be an entire movie and blood and guts, but to at least introduce how far Wolverine and his abilities can go would go a long way toward giving us Logan we know and love. Instead, the worst that happens to Wolverine is losing his hair in an explosion, and a guy gets stabbed in the neck with no blood in sight. Would it have really been so horrible to have an explosion take some of the skin of his face to regenerate, and for a couple of guys to have their legs chopped off in battle?

The rest of the positives all come with negatives of their own. Thankfully, The Wolverine does not try to throw a ton of X-Men characters at you like Origins did, however by the end of the movie all of those characters get exposed for their character flaws. Viper is initially believable as a biochemist to go with her powers, but then she also knows ninjitsu? The other supporting characters seem to swap sides on a dime, and seriously does everyone have to be a trained ninja? I also liked having the bulk of the movie take place in Japan to separate it from the other X-films and provide a fresh setting true to the comics, but despite being on location, it was a very Americanized interpretation. More Rush Hour than Kill Bill. The more I think about it, that could some up my entire opinion of the movie.

Hugh Jackman is of course great as Wolverine. He could probably do this in his sleep by now but he keeps bringing the attitude and look you want from Logan. He just isn’t required to do enough with it here. The rest of the cast is fine, excluding Rila Fukushima who stands out as Yukio, Logan’s sidekick.

I didn’t hate The Wolverine by any means. I just didn’t like it very much. It existed. It was better than X-Men Origins: Wolverine. It just wasn’t more than that.

Stay for the post credit scene though. It makes the whole movie worth going to.

Free Comic Book Day Q&A with Joe Field

Christmas is great, but if you’re looking for a present now know this: Free Comic Book Day is just days upon us. The annual event is exactly what it sounds like. Comic book stores around the world give away comics to anyone that walks in. This year it is this Saturday, May 5th. Yes, that’s the day after The Avengers hits theaters. In honor of the best idea since pizza Fridays at school, I spoke to Joe Field, the founder of Free Comic Book Day, about the comic book industry.

-What inspired you to come up with Free Comic Book Day?
The business of comics had come through a tumultuous time in the late ’90s. When things started turning around, I saw a need for a massive invitation for everyone to check out what’s going on weekly in their local comic shop. I wrote a column for a trade magazine, outlining Free Comic Book Day and suggesting it be modeled after other “free” events. The column was met with enthusiasm!

-What went into getting all of the other comic book stores involved?
I knew that I couldn’t coordinate the event, so I turned to the dominant distributor of comics in the English-speaking world, Diamond Comic Distributors. Their team has regular contact with all comic book stores on a regular basis, so I was confident they could do the job— and they’ve done it exceedingly well for these last 11 years.

-Was there any suggestion by the comic book industry to have The Avengers movie come out on the same weekend as Free Comic Book Day?
Free Comic Book Day  has been the “first Saturday in May” for 10 of its 11 years. In most cases, there has been a comics-related movie attached to the same weekend. I choose to look at it as Hollywood coming to comics, rather than comics being a barnacle on the Good-Ship Hollywood.

-Do you think the industry is taking enough advantage of the comic book movie franchises and their popularity?
Movies are passive entertainment. You pay for your ticket, then sit in your seat and watch. The reading of comics and graphic novels is a much more involved experience. There’s reading the words, interpreting the art, filling in the time between panels ans scenes. In short, there’s more required of a comic book reader than there is of a movie watcher.

Really, I think the movies have been a great calling card for comic books. I honestly hope that more movie-goers will want to check out the source material for all these comics-based movies!

-What do you think of the current state of comic book stores?
With some 2500 comic shops in the U.S. and Canada, I don’t think there is one “current state.” Many retailers are thriving and some are having a tough time paying the bills. That’s just like any other business segment these days.

As the current president of ComicsPRO, the only retailer trade association of comic book specialty retailers, the trends look good right now. More people are reading comics, other media are getting some of their biggest ideas from comics and comic retailers seem to be better prepared and more professionally adept than at any time since I got into the business 25 years ago.

-Are digital comics helping or hurting business?
I have seen no indication that digital comics are putting a dent into print comics. Every other print media would love to have the conditions that are current in comics— handling growth rather than managing a slow steep decline, new ideas, formats and ways of doing business, rather than the same old reliance on advertising to drive the editorial.

Make no mistake, digital comics are a growing segment of the overall comics business, but so are print comics.

-How difficult is it to maintain a store these days?
Owning any small business has a multitude of challenges.  I discovered a long time ago that I had a difficult time have anyone as my boss. Now that I am my own boss, I find the pressure much more significant, but also much more satisfying.

-Do you see this event growing more in the upcoming years?
Free Comic Book Day has been growing for the last ten years and it sure looks like there’s a lot of life in it! This year, events will take place in 2000 stores in nearly 50 countries, with more than 3.5 million comics available to be given away.

-Are there any changes you think should be made with stores or the industry itself?
The most significant thing to come out of the success of Free Comic Book Day , in my estimation, is that it has led to many retailers working much more effectively on reaching outside of their stores to find new customers, to do more events, to really integrate their comics’ businesses in with the overall business of entertainment.

-Anything else you would like to add?
Comics are a lot more than just being about whatever the latest super-hero movie is. If you like to read, if you enjoy reading novels or you enjoy going to art galleries, if you enjoy any of the visual arts, then I maintain that regularly visiting a well-stocked comic book specialty store is definitely worth outing on your “to do” list. Comic books and graphic novels are the white-hot core of visual entertainment!